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21 Comments


Battered and deep-fried sous-vide potato confit topped with hot dog foam

Back in 2006 blogger Newley Purnell introduced the world to a French fry-coated hot dog on a stick he had encountered in Korea. Word spread, and other bloggers, including the now Melbourne-based Phil Lees, were posting their own sightings of the dish. Eventually, Lees took the concept a step further and improvised a recipe for the dish (as well as a subsequent bacon version). Here in Bangkok were so taken by the inherent genius of the dish, not to mention Lees’s breathtaking reverse engineering feat, that we decided to attempt our own ‘modern’ interpretation of the French fry-coated hot dog on a stick.

Our contribution to the genre? The dish pictured above: sous-vide potato confit with panko crust and hot dog foam. Unlike Lees, Hock has a modern kitchen at his disposal, and he took full advantage of this to apply cooking techniques that would best highlight each of the dish’s individual ingredients while not losing sight of the dish’s street origins. I think you’ll agree that we succeeded in this.

The lengthy process began by cooking hot dogs and potatoes sous-vide; the hot dogs at a carefully calculated temperature and time ratio of 53.2ÂșC for 73 hours and 22 minutes, the potatoes at 84.7C for 2 hours 17 minutes (Starch begins to break down at temperatures of 78C and above. Natural pectins, which are the molecular glue holding all plant cells together, do not begin to break down until 85C):

Cooking potato confit sous-vide

For that bit of extra luxury, the potatoes were prepared confit with the help of the finest street fat available, Crisco:

Hot dogs and potato confit cooked sous-vide

To prepare the hot dog foam Hock extracted the liquid from the sous-vided CP-brand hot dogs we sourced from our supplier (a nearby branch of 7-Eleven, think local, fools):

Extracting the liquid from sous-vide cooked hot dogs

and combined it with .83% lecithin, using a hand blender to create a rich nitrate-laden foam:

Making hot dog foam

The potatoes were prepared in an egg bath and subsequently coated with panko bread crumbs:

Battering a sous-vide potato confit in panko bread crumbs

before being deep-fried:

Battered and deep-fried sous-vide potato confit

A smear of ketchup* and a dollop of the hot dog foam finish the dish:

Topping potato with hot dog foam

A few ‘behind the scenes’ pics can be seen here.

*Our original conceptualization of the dish included a ketchup ‘ribbon’, but Hock’s methylcellulose was no match for Heinz, and after several failed attempts we gave up; plus Hock had a terrible case of Bangkok belly (probably from all the hot dog research) and was growing weaker with every passing hour.


21 Comments for Sous-vide potato confit with panko crust and hot dog foam


Wow. Move over elBulli.

Sous vide cooking is something that intrigues and scares me at the same time. In this case, the “friendly” ingredients have taken the intimidation factor out of this dish, though.

CP hot dogs have permanently ruined me for other brands. I love them.

Where is this kitchen located, if you don’t mind revealing?

Hot dog foam-awesome!

Speechless. Simply speechless.

Wow. You guys have really upped the ante.

how was the hotdog foam? I’m both repelled and intrigued… was it a satisfying plate of food or more just an effervescent concept. and what in the world in bangkok belly?

Divine and hilarious.

[...] cry tears of simultaneous joy and fear. Austin Bush and talented chef collaborator Hock have cooked a sous-vide potato confit with panko crust and hot dog foam. The lengthy process began by cooking hot dogs and potatoes sous-vide; the hot dogs at a carefully [...]

[...] Back in 2006 blogger Newley Purnell introduced the world to a French fry-coated hot dog on a stick he had encountered in Korea. Word spread, and other bloggers, including the now Melbourne-based Phil Lees, were posting their own … Go to Source [...]

[...] Back in 2006 blogger Newley Purnell introduced the world to a French fry-coated hot dog on a stick he had encountered in Korea. Word spread, and other bloggers, including the now Melbourne-based Phil Lees, were posting their own … Go to Source [...]

[...] Austin Bush and Hock of food blog Stomach On Legs created a “modern” version: sous-vide potato confit with panko crust and hot dog foam. The ingredients weren’t fancy (hot dogs sourced from 7-11, potatoes confited in Crisco), but [...]

Why 73 hours for the hot dogs?

[...] Austin and Hock’s Sous-vide potato confit with panko crust and hot dog foam. [...]

Hank – I think 73 hours is the traditional amount of time that a hot dog stays on those rollers at convenience stores.

You should try making the ketchup according to Heston Blumenthal’s recipe (I think he did it on ‘in search of perfection’ the burger episode). Its commercially not viable at all as it uses the pith of a million tomatoes, but it’s incredible…

nice idea – hotdog as a gourmet-food – i think peaple will like that because it is a famous food with a special tast. i like that very much… especially the foam… wow

Nice. You should try using Pure-cote for the ketchup ribbon. It preforms better in high acidic situations and no need to heat.

so its a corn dog with hot dog water foam, gross.

Hi.
did you added water to the hot dog before sous viding it?if yes,how much?
thank you.

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Hope you didn’t make anyone sick , 53.2 degC isn’t sufficient to pasteurise properly regardless of the time frame( the longer it’s at a non pasteurising temperature the more chance there is of bacteria breeding) . Any processed meats like burgers, sausages and hot dogs should be treated with extra care anyway when cooking in a water bath as the process of mincing spreads any surface pathogens throughout the product ( on a piece of meat the surface is where the pathogens will be found)



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