A blog about food in Thailand
and elsewhere.



Modern Thai cuisine

Posted date:  December 7, 2007
8 Comments


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Phil’s recent post at The Last Appetite reminded me that I’ve yet to post a few additional images from our recent mini Southeast Asian bloggers summit. The pictures in question are of khanom pang ping sangkhayaa, toast topped with a kind of coconut custard (pictured above). I’m not entirely sure what is responsible for the orange colour, but whatever it was, it tasted as artificial as it looked.

There was also nom naam daeng:

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chilled milk mixed with naam daeng, a syrup-and-food-colouring mixture that all Thais seem to love, and that I thought went very well with this employee’s outfit:

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Despite garish colours involved, I actually like this restaurant. It’s called Thian Song, and is an old-school Chinese eatery-slash coffee shop in a fun part of town, minutes from the Giant Swing. It’s probably favourite place to drink iced coffee–just stay away from anything bright.

Thian Song (Google Maps link)
168-172 Thanon Din Sor
02 224 4554
8am-8.30pm


8 Comments for Modern Thai cuisine


Scary colours!

A

The iced coffee I had was most excellent.

That orange goop still scares me

The pink colour drink is made from rose syrup and milk, in Malaysia in known as Air Bandung.

The coconut milk-based jam is called “kaya”, and is also widely available in Singapore and Malaysia, although we don’t have it such a garish orangey color…

Original Thai ‘sangkhayaa’, coconut milk-based jam (which sometime can be milk) are in 2 colors – green and yolkish. The green and color were supposed to be from Pandon leaf, and eggs not artificial colors like nowadays.

this is not related to your post at all (which was good!) – but, I’ve had a hankering for Soi Polo garlic chicken (maybe because I’ve been drinking beer). As I’m not in Thailand, any hopes of tracking down a recipe? Man, if you could…I’d drink a beer on your behalf! :-)

actually, thai pink milk is different from the malaysian version.. in thailand the syrup is meant to approximate the taste of the sala fruit, rather than rose.



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Modern Thai cuisine

Posted date:  October 10, 2007
3 Comments


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Spotted at a market in Chanthaburi. My sources tell me they are filled with some sort of sweet liquid and are particularly favoured by the younger generation. Perhaps my all-knowing food mentor Aong can provide some insight? Anybody else?

More from Chanthaburi to follow in the next couple days.


3 Comments for Modern Thai cuisine


I remembered these syrup water tube when i was young. They also like to freeze it and serve like ice-pop.

Yup, I agree with Petekan! I used to love eating these as a child! They are a bit like jelly crystal, taste great when frozen!

Your “delicious” pictures reminded me about my cf card as it crushed when i came back from a media tour to Thailand and…i was scolded by the editor seriously *sob sob



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Modern Thai cuisine

Posted date:  August 3, 2007
3 Comments


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Khanom bueang, temple fair, Ayuthaya. Mmm…


3 Comments for Modern Thai cuisine


the colour that scares me…

wondering what kind of colour they are using…

look interesting & delicious…
Thai dessert very colorful~~~
Malaysia also have a lot of colorful dessert make from natural ingredients.

Everytime I see the word modern associated with a cuisine, I cringe…sooner or later, every distinct cuisine is going to taste alike and modern! I beg for authenticity…modern is really easy to mash up and do, that’s why I don’t fancy or respect those celeb chefs. I respect the home cooks that can make really really good and original dishes. :P



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